Representative Neil Hays

Hi, I'm Neil Hays and I represent the people of Oklahoma's 13th District.

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News & Announcements


Feb 21, 2024
Recent Posts

House Approves Legislation to Protect Against Digitized Deception

Rep. Neil Hays, R-Checotah, secured passage of a bill designed to prevent the unauthorized sharing of digitized depictions of individuals. House Bill 3073 would criminalize publishing or distributing digitized representations of someone else's name, image, voice, or likeness without their written consent and with the intent to harm. "This bill aims to prevent the misuse of artificial intelligence as a weapon against individuals," Hays said. "Our goal is not to control AI, but rather to create a responsible environment for its development and utilization by adapting to technological advancements and establishing regulatory frameworks." As an example, Hays cited the case of Lainey Wilson being targeted by deep fakes produced by artificial intelligence. Wilson revealed in her testimony to Congress that an AI-generated likeness of herself was used to promote weight loss products despite never endorsing them. The measure introduces misdemeanor and felony charges for sharing and publishing specific digitized content. A first offense is a misdemeanor, while a second offense becomes a felony, punishable by at least one year in jail and a $5,000 fine. Failure to disclose that an image is digitized will result in a misdemeanor. HB3073 passed the House 81-15.



Feb 7, 2024
Recent Posts

Bill Protecting Against Digitized Deception Passes Committee

The House Judiciary Criminal Committee approved a bill designed to prevent the unauthorized sharing of digitized depictions of individuals. Rep. Neil Hays, R-Checotah, authored House Bill 3073, which criminalizes publishing or distributing digitized representations of someone else's name, image, voice, or likeness without their written consent and with the intent to harm. Hays argued this bill is necessary to address the increasing prevalence of such acts in today's digital age, particularly with the rise of artificial intelligence. "Our goal here is not to regulate artificial intelligence but to ensure that its application is not weaponized against individuals," Hays said. "In a tech-driven world, we must commit to protecting the public from the dangers of online deception." The measure introduces misdemeanor and felony charges for sharing and publishing specific digitized content. A first offense is a misdemeanor, while a second offense becomes a felony, punishable by at least one year in jail and a $5,000 fine. Failure to disclose that an image is digitized will result in a misdemeanor.  HB3073 is now eligible to be considered by the full House.  



Mar 22, 2023
Recent Posts

House Passes Bill to Offer Mental Health Coverage to First Responders

OKLAHOMA CITY –  The Oklahoma House of Representatives on Tuesday passed legislation to offer mental health coverage to first responders. Rep. Neil Hays, R-Checotah, filed House Bill 2398, which would offer mental health coverage to first responders through Oklahoma's workers' compensation insurance laws without a physical injury present. Currently, first responders are excluded from coverage unless an underlying physical injury exists. "First responders are an imperative part of our communities, and we owe it to them and their families to protect them," Hays said. "This bill takes an essential step toward ensuring that first responders have access to mental health services. It's time for us to help those who serve us daily." HB2398 would allow a first responder who is deemed unable to temporarily work by a physician to receive 70% of their average weekly pay up to the state average wage or the greater of the weekly benefit provided in an employer's policy. Under HB2398, a first responder who cannot return to work after maximum medical improvement may be given permanent disability benefits. If a first responder is diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, the employer will provide treatment for up to one year but is not responsible for prescription medication expenses exceeding $10,000. HB2398 passed the House floor 84-5 and now moves to the Senate.